Early Intervention, Wish I Could Get It

There was a misinterpretation of results. Turns out S does not qualify for early intervention. The normal maternal reaction is probably relief, but I’m disappointed. Having her qualify didn’t make her any more behind than I thought she was; it just meant that she was going to get help and support. Having her not qualify doesn’t make her any less behind. She’s still not talking. We just don’t get the help. Boo.

The assessment covers 5 areas of development: Adaptive, Personal/Social, Communication, Motor and Cognitive. A “development quotient” (way to say “score” without saying “score”) of 77 or below in any area would qualify for early intervention. Average normal scores fall between 85 and 115 and S’s scores range from 86 to 110, well out of the range for intervention.

I was given some tips and tricks and told to call back if she does not make a huge leap by her second birthday. So, if you see me making funny sounds at my toddler, (“bay-BEE!”) please ignore.

Speech Delay Update

Thank you all for your kind thoughts, words of experience, etc. The evaluation was actually a lot of fun. S had a great time. Three women were here for 2 hours of high level toddler entertainment. The evaluation is comprised of 5 areas and they were only able to complete 3, so we’re not officially done. They come back on Tuesday morning to finish up and give me more information but they were able to tell me that S does qualify for early intervention.

I don’t have a heck of a lot more to tell you at this point. I’m happy that she qualifies and am confident that with some focus and direction she’ll be a chatterbox like her brother in no time.

Lazy? Stupid? Shy?

I spend most of my time here talking about L. Once in a while I write about S’s adorable-ness, but she definitely takes a backseat in terms of the percentage of my angst she causes compared to her brother. So here’s something you may not know about her: she doesn’t really talk yet. At 21 months old, she is waaaaaaaaaaay behind her peers. While they are putting together simple phrases and consistently naming the objects around them, S says only a small handful of single words. Words like up, mama, dada, more, bye-bye, boo-boo. It was nearly a year ago when I was told to worry that she didn’t know a cow says moo. Guess what? She still doesn’t know.

S can understand anything that is said to her. She can follow a series of directions and will point to the correct object when I name it. Her problem is clearly not cognitive. Is she just lazy? She is actually quite able to tell me a whole story with a combination of charades and simple words. She can, for example, convey that she has a boo-boo on her head because she was on the couch and L pushed her off causing her head to hit the coffee table. Since she’s so good at communicating this way, why bother talking?

Whatever the reason for her delayed speech, my it-will-work-itself-out approach hasn’t been effective (yet). So today I’m having her evaluated to see if she’s eligible for early intervention. I imagine that she’s going to fall just to the normal side of the upper limit of what would qualify. Meaning that she’s speaking at the bottom-most possible level of what is considered normal. And this will be fine with me, because I do still believe it will work itself out. It’s just taking longer than I anticipated.

Funny thing is that when L was about 19 months old I had him evaluated for the very same reason. He had 3 words, which only I could understand: “ma-em” for milk. “cheese” for please, and “do-do” for thank you. (So polite!) I set up the appointment and by the time the team of evaluators arrived at my door a few weeks later, L was totally talking. And hasn’t stopped since. (rim-shot) I attributed L’s lateness to the fact that he’s a boy, and that he was too busy figuring out how to run, jump, climb, and break dance to bother learning to talk. But not only is S a girl, she also spends a lot less time break dancing. Anyway, I fully expected her to start talking before the evaluation date, but it’s in an hour, and she wasn’t talking this morning and she’s sleeping now, so I think that’s not happening.

I’ll let you know how it goes.