The 12 Days of Christmas Mom


Here’s my ultimate wish list from my true loves three*:

On the first day of Christmas

my true loves gave to me

a housekeeper who arrives each day at three.

 

On the second day of Christmas

my true loves gave to me

two kids I’m proud of

and a housekeeper who arrives each day at three.

 

On the third day of Christmas

my true loves gave to me

three French wines

two kids I’m proud of

and a housekeeper who arrives each day at three.

 

On the fourth day of Christmas

my true loves gave to me

four Colin Firths**

three French wines

two kids I’m proud of

and a housekeeper who arrives each day at three.

colin firth

On the fifth day of Christmas

my true loves gave to me

five golden rings***

four Colin Firths

three French wines

two kids I’m proud of

and a housekeeper who arrives each day at three.

 

On the sixth day of Christmas

my true loves gave to me

six hours o’peaceful playing

five golden rings

four Colin Firths

three French wines

two kids I’m proud of

and a housekeeper who arrives each day at three.

 

On the seventh day of Christmas

my true loves gave to me

seven coffees brimming

six hours o’peaceful playing

five golden rings

four Colin Firths

three French wines

two kids I’m proud of

and a housekeeper who arrives each day at three.

 

On the eighth day of Christmas

my true loves gave to me

eight maids a dusting

seven coffees brimming

six hours o’peaceful playing

five golden rings

four Colin Firths

three French wines

two kids I’m proud of

and a housekeeper who arrives each day at three.

 

On the ninth day of Christmas

my true loves gave to me

nine nights romancing

eight maids a dusting

seven coffees brimming

six hours o’peaceful playing

five golden rings

four Colin Firths

three French wines

two kids I’m proud of

and a housekeeper who arrives each day at three.

 

On the tenth day of Christmas

my true loves gave to me

ten hours o’sleeping

nine nights romancing

eight maids a dusting

seven coffees brimming

six hours o’peaceful playing

five golden rings

four Colin Firths

three French wines

two kids I’m proud of

and a housekeeper who arrives each day at three.

 

On the eleventh day of Christmas

my true loves gave to me

eleven days no griping

ten hours o’sleeping

nine nights romancing

eight maids a dusting

seven coffees brimming

six hours o’peaceful playing

five golden rings

four Colin Firths

three French wines

two kids I’m proud of

and a housekeeper who arrives each day at three.

 

On the twelfth day of Christmas

my true loves gave to me

twelve blog posts cunning

eleven days no griping

ten hours o’sleeping

nine nights romancing

eight maids a dusting

seven coffees brimming

six hours o’peaceful playing

five golden rings

four Colin Firths

three French wines

two kids I’m proud of

and a housekeeper who arrives each day at three.

 

* My husband and my kids. Nothing scandalous.

** What? I want four of him.

*** The original got this one right.


Originally published December 2012. 

More Soap Please

It’s that time of year again! I’m not talking about the holidays, but about the time of year when I look at the cherubic rosy faces of your children with horror and suspicion. Is that button nose running because of the brisk wind outside? Or is it because that face is a festering mass of mucus just waiting to sneeze out onto my kid’s sandwich? Your daughter’s pigtails aren’t just an adorable means to keep her hair out of her snot, but are potentially harboring a blight of lice just waiting for my daughter to try on her hat.

That’s right. It’s the time of year when parents walk the fine line between trying to keep our kids healthy and trying not to turn them into crazy people. I see germs everywhere.

You see, your kids are gross. Don’t be offended; mine are gross too. Their hands have most certainly been in questionable places and they leave much to be desired when it comes to being generally civilized and not disgusting. And if post-bathroom handwashing statistics are to be believed, adults are gross too.

I can handle my kids’ gross. (Because I have to.) Your kids’ gross is another story.

My child’s runny nose? Not my favorite thing, but I’ve been known to have my coat pockets full of other people’s used tissues and I’ve lived to tell the tale. Your child’s runny nose? The worst! It is an ominous foreshadowing of the illness that will take down my family.

I’m always on the lookout to keep my family healthy. We aim for a mostly healthy diet, mostly healthy sleep habits, mostly healthy days containing some form of physical exercise. My kids have regular checkups and are vaccinated, including the annual flu vaccine.

I can’t control your children’s mucus; all I can do is try to keep it off my kids’ hands. To that end, we’re frequent hand washers. The kids are pretty good about it. They know it’s the first thing we do when we come home from anywhere. We wash off school germs after school, supermarket germs after the supermarket, outside germs after playing outside. We wash our hands before meals and definitely after using the bathroom.

I hope I’m staying just on this side of crazy, but I can’t guarantee that I am. So far it seems to be working. My kids are sick infrequently. I totally just cursed us all.

This is a sponsored post for Gigasavvy. The opinions in this article are my own. I do not work for, or with, any brand mentioned in this article, nor do I have any official relationship with them.  I have a relationship with GigaSavvy, for whom I create original editorial content.

Embarrassment

When I was a kid my parents embarrassed me, constantly and on purpose. I grew up believing that it was the parents’ right, nay job, to embarrass their offspring. So now that I’m a parent, it’s my job too, right? Well, it turns out I’m still learning that life isn’t fair, because I’m still the one being embarrassed. This time by my offspring – my evil genius Luke.

He’s embarrassed me in so many ways. Opening public bathroom doors when I’m, well, not ready. Talking about indelicate topics in front of other people (“My nipples are small, and so are daddy’s, but mommy’s are big!”) Or, my favorite, throwing an epic tantrum at age 3 because I would not buy him a training bra. That’s right. A training bra.

Here’s the scene: Target, tween girl section. A huge display of training bras in a myriad of attractive pastels. Think: a wall of Easter eggs. But soft and silky, lightly padded (wtf?) and smooth. Luke heaven. He wanted one. Bad.

He walked up to the display wall as if in a trance. Arms outstretched. He touched every bra he could reach. “They’re so soft and pretty. Can I have one, Mommy? Pleeeeaaaaaase??” I hear some snickering from somewhere behind me. “No, Luke, I’m sorry, you can’t have one of those. Those are training bras and they’re for big girls, not 3-year-old boys.”

Fast forward about 8 seconds. Luke is now on the floor screaming and kicking everything in sight. This was not your average tantrum; this one was turned up to eleven. Between the shrieks and sobs he shouted the following things:

“I want a training bra!”

“I am a big girl!”

“I don’t like you, Mommy!”

“Training bra!”

“Training braaaaaaaaa!”

I now have the attention of all Target shoppers. Most think it’s pretty hilarious, and really, I do too. I certainly would have enjoyed myself if this were someone else’s kid. But he was mine and I was expected to take him back home with me.

It’s OK though. I have a plan. I will win this one in the end. With just a little patience, I will have the last laugh. See, I’m storing this memory for future use. It’s a weapon. My embarrassment at the time will be nothing compared to his when I feel the time is right to retell this story. To a group of his friends? To his girlfriend? His future in-laws? All the guests at his wedding? Time will tell when it will come back out. It all depends on how well Luke treats me from here on out.

At last! I will have the last laugh! Revenge will be mine! Bwahahahahahahahahaha!

 

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